Fig and Almond Cake

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I am sad to say that I am getting very close to the end of my fresh figs. The two trees that I pick from are just about finished and I may have just one small bowl left to pick in a day or so if the heavy rain storm last night hasn’t already knocked them off the trees. I canned 8 jars of a fig and apple combination yesterday that I use to make tarts with so next season when we return to Umbria I’ll have my filling ready to make tarts for our farmhouse guests. After making my canned tart filling, I had 8 nice sized figs leftover (after I gobbled up 4 raw), so I decided to throw together this easy fig cake recipe.

This cake is a thin one, more like a crustless tart really, though it is very moist. The cake uses minimal white flour, and uses mostly almond meal for the batter which is something I am in favor of. I enjoyed a slice of this cake for breakfast, but it would also be great served with a dollop of whipped cream for dessert.

I originally made this recipe using Italian prune plums and found it delicious, but since the original New York Times recipe used fresh figs, I decided I wanted to try that version as well and it really is the perfect combination of figs and almonds. Since this cake is so moist, if not enjoyed the day it is made it is best stored covered in plastic wrap in the refrigerator.

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Buon Appetito!
Deborah Mele 2013

Fig and Almond Cake

Ingredients:

  • 1 Cup Almond Meal
  • 1/4 Cup Sugar, Plus 2 Tablespoons
  • 1/4 Cup All-purpose Flour
  • 1 Teaspoon Baking Powder
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 3 Eggs At Room Temperature, Lightly Beaten
  • 4 Tablespoons Butter, Melted & Cooled
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Almond Extract
  • 8 Fresh Figs

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. and lightly grease a 9-inch fluted pan.
  2. In one bowl, toss together the almond meal, sugar, all purpose flour, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt.
  3. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, butter, and almond extract.
  4. Dump the dry ingredients into the wet, and whisk just until mixed.
  5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan.
  6. Remove the stem from each fig, then cut in half.
  7. Arrange the figs cut side up over the batter, pushing the figs gently into the batter.
  8. Sprinkle the remaining 2 tablespoons of sugar over the figs, then bake for about 30 minutes or until the cake is set in the center.
  9. Cool to room temperature before serving.

Adapted from Fig and Almond Cake by Davide Tanis for The New York Times.