Chicken Galliano With Mushrooms

I was craving chicken recently, which is not an uncommon occurrence for me I must say, and if you visit this blog often you’ll know that I have a “thing” for poultry. I could honestly give up all red meat, and even seafood if I had to, but do not EVER take away my chicken! We eat chicken at least twice a week and as long as I keep it interesting, my husband thankfully does not complain. I was thinking about my dish all day, trying to decide what I wanted to make, and finally decided to make chicken lightly flavored with alcohol of some type. Looking through my cabinet, realized that I had a bottle of Galliano I had bought over the holidays but never opened, so decided to give that a try.

Galliano is sweet with vanilla-anise flavor with subtle citrus and woodsy herbal under notes, and a bottle of Galliano begins it’s life with the careful blending of some 30 herbs, spices and plant extracts. I always have some chicken in the freezer, so I pulled out a package of chicken breasts from the freezer, as well as some mushrooms from the refrigerator, and came up with this recipe. I was a little concerned that the Galliano might be a tad overpowering so didn’t use too much, but once the dish was completely prepared, you could not pick out the Galliano, and instead you just knew there was an intriguing flavor to the dish that was truly delicious. I might even increase the amount of Galliano I use to 1/3 a cup next time I make this dish, but I’ll leave that decision up to you. You can use any mushrooms you prefer such as cremini, portobello, or even button mushrooms.

There really is no substitute that I know of for the Galliano, but if it is difficult to find, I’d suggest using vermouth or marsala instead. The flavor will be different, but very tasty as well. If you do not want to use alcohol (it burns off when cooked), simply add a little additional broth instead. Again, you’ll miss that intriguing flavor of this complex liqueur, but will have a nice chicken dish.

Buon Appetito!
Deborah Mele 2013

Chicken Galliano With Mushrooms

Yield: Serves 4 - 6

Prep Time: 15 mins

Cook Time: 25

Ingredients:

4 Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts, Sliced in Half Lengthwise Making Two Thinner Cutlets
1 Cup All-purpose Flour Seasoned With Salt & Pepper
3 Tablespoons Olive Oil
3 Tablespoons Butter, Divided In Half
1 (8 Ounce) Package Mushrooms, Trimmed & Sliced
3 Cloves Garlic, Peeled & Sliced Thin
1 Cup Low Sodium Chicken Broth
1/4 Cup Galliano Liqueur
Salt & Pepper
1/4 Cup Chopped Fresh Parsley

Directions:

Dredge the chicken slices in the seasoned flour mixture, covering each side well.
In a heavy skillet, heat the oil and 1 1/2 tablespoon of the butter until sizzling over medium heat and cook the chicken for about 12 to 13 minutes or until almost cooked through, turning halfway.
Place the chicken on a heated platter, and cook the mushrooms until lightly browned, about 5 minutes, stirring often.
Add the garlic, and cook just until fragrant.
Add the broth and liqueur and turn up heat to medium high.
Return the chicken to the skillet, and cook until the sauce reduces and begins to thicken, about 6 to 8 minutes.
Taste, and season with salt and pepper, and stir in the remaining butter until melted.
Stir the parsley into the mixture and serve the chicken immediately on a platter, topped with the mushrooms and any remaining sauce.



 

6 Responses to “Chicken Galliano With Mushrooms”

  1. 1
    CB Cuono — January 31, 2013 @ 3:15 pm

    Thank you, Deborah. This is a tasty yet rapidly prepared dish! The family prefers the more flavorful dark meat, so I use boneless, skinless chicken thighs. Many nationalities boast a liqueur w/ an anise flavor, and I’ve tried many in cooking—never with a bad outcome. I especially like the French Pernod or the French Pastis de Marseille. I have also used Greek Ouzo.
    Anise liqueurs also work very well with seafoods and shellfish (think scampi in butter or scallops). They can be turned into exquisite dishes when a hint of anise is added with enough time to cook off the alcohol. It’s not as odd-ball as one might think. Many varieties of basil, a member of the mint family, contain anethole, which is the essential oil characteristic of anise.

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  2. 2
    Bobbie Pitkin — January 31, 2013 @ 4:30 pm

    I can’t wait to make this dish!!! I love Galliano, it’s a taste I haven’t had in a long time, but it brings back wonderful memories!

    I love your blog, I share it with friends, and I find the most wonderful ideas here!

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  3. 3
    Elisa Whittington — February 1, 2013 @ 10:37 pm

    Oh this looks just too good to be true! Galliano! It all makes sense. I’ll be making this dish over the weekend.

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  4. 4
    Denise Tyrpin — April 22, 2013 @ 12:57 pm

    Finally made this wonderful dish saturday night, everyone LOVED it! Thank you for such a delicious recipe. Will be making this again real soon!

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    Deborah Reply:

    Thanks for posting Denise, and I’m happy the recipe was a success!

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  5. 5
    Pierre Cope — March 30, 2014 @ 7:27 am

    Thanks for this on Debora! I cooked this last weekend for thirteen guests along with your Avocada Pasta recipe.

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